The Nazca Lines & Symbols: Environmental Concerns

The Nazca Lines & Symbols: Environmental Concerns
According to Viktoria Nikitzki of the Maria Reiche Centre (an organization dedicated to studying and protecting the Nazca Lines), pollution and erosion caused by deforestation threaten the continued existence of the Nazca lines. She is quoted as saying "The Lines themselves are superficial, they are only 10 to 30cm deep and could be easily washed away...

The Nazca Lines & Symbols: Simple Engineering

The Nazca Lines & Symbols: Simple Engineering
Since many of the drawings must be viewed from the air to be seen in their entirety, the task of getting such large figures so perfectly proportioned and the lines so straight was thought to have required an observer from above to guide the drawings. This led some to hypothesize that the Nazcans may have been capable of flight! (however, there is NO PROOF of this!)

The Nazca Lines & Symbols: The Discovery

The Nazca Lines & Symbols: The Discovery
In 1927, archaeologist Mejia Xespe an assistant to Julio C. Tello, the Father of Peruvian Archeology - was told of the presence of some mysterious geoglyphs or lines or traces on the ground along the Peruvian coast. In those days, he had just started his archaeological studies and had not given much importance to these suggestive lines in the Pampas Nasca. It is important to understand that the appeal of an unknown series of lines was much lower than other, more attractive archaeological sites, such as Chavin, Chan-Chan, and, of course, the majestic Machu Picchu in Cuzco department.

The Nazca Lines & Symbols?

The Nazca Lines & Symbols?
The Nazca lines aren't the only geoglyphs in the world. The tradition of drawing figures on the ground spans the pacific coastal desert areas from central California to northern Chile, as well as Europe and Asia. The drawings at Nazca, however, are unique because of their size and density within a 500 square kilometer area in southwest Peru. Straight lines that go on for hundreds of kilometers, only swerving out by a few degrees, huge trapezoids and spirals, and animal figures, some of which can be seen in their entirety from space - have been holding the attention of archeologists since the 1920s.

The Nazca Area

The Nazca Area
The town of Nazca has recently been dumping its trash on the pampa (plain), destroying some of the Nazca lines in the process. This has caused some controversy; it is believed the mayor issued the order to protest a lack of aid to Nazca. Under President Alberto Ken'ya Fujimori's rule, Nazca received money to turn the irrigation canals (part of the Cantayo Aqueduct system) into tourist attractions. Unfortunately, this consisted of tearing up some of the access points to the canals and replacing them with reconstructions of how they were believed to have looked.